Aspen 6000 water treatment unit

The Aspen High Output 60.000 Lightweight/Mobile/Tactical Purifier is a self-contained water purification system comprised of a diatomaceous earth (DE) filter and a chlorine injection system.

Product Description

Aspen HO 60,000 LMT
The Aspen High Output 60.000 Lightweight/Mobile/Tactical Purifier is a self-contained water purification system comprised of a diatomaceous earth (DE) filter and a chlorine injection system. Its compact size and portability allows purifying over 11000 liters per hour of water at the point of need.

What contaminants does it remove?
DE filtration is proven to remove particulates in the one-micron range including turbidity, bacteria and chlorine-resistant pathogens such as cryptosporidium and giardia. Certain grades of DE are certified to NSF/ANSI Standard 61 for drinking water system components and independent university labs confirmed that DE can remove >6 logs (99.9999%) of the above contaminants. The chlorine system is designed to kill any viruses present in the feed water. It is widely recognized that contamination from microbes and viruses pose a greater immediate threat to human health than most other contaminants.

How does such a small system deliver so much water?
DE has unique physical and chemical properties providing a highly effective filtering media in many filtration applications. De’s inertness in almost all liquids and its internal pore structure provides high permeability, and low bulk density.

How long does a filtration cycle last?
That depends on the amount of impurities in the feed water, but the system can be adjusted to efficiently handle varying amounts of contaminants. Typical operation calls for backwashing of the system after 20 hours of operation. Only about five percent of the total amount of water processed is required for the backwashing operation.

Is this new technology?
Municipal water treatment plants have used DE filtration in conjunction with chlorine disinfection for over 80 years.

Why do you use chlorine as a disinfectant?
In many environments the water distribution systems after purification are susceptible to microbial contamination, and chlorine offers better residual disinfection.

What about harmful disinfection byproducts?
Disinfection byproducts (DBPs) such as trihalomethanes (THMs) are produced when chlorine reacts with biodegradable organic matter (BOM). Because of the efficient removal of this type of contaminant by the DE filter, there is little contact with chlorine and the BOM. While ozonation does not form THMs, it does form other harmful byproducts, and when water-containing bromide is ozonated, a by-product called bromate is formed that is a suspected carcinogen.

Can it desalinate seawater?
No. The salt in seawater is at the ionic level and represents one of the smallest sized particles that must be removed to produce drinking water.

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